Recent Updates to Web of Science

Recent Updates to Web of Science

Thomson Reuters recently announced a few changes to its resources:

Journal Citation Reports (JCR) has moved to the InCites platform, which also includes Essential Scientific Indicators (ESI), a new product for UC campuses. Together JCR and ESI form Journal and Highly Cited Data (JHCD), a comprehensive assessment tool that reflects how collaborative and competitive the current global research environment is.

With JCR’s transition to the InCites platform comes new metrics and features:

  • JIF percentiles: the Journal Impact Factor Percentile within the subject category
  • Normalized Eigenfactor Score: a value of 1 indicates average influence within a subject category
  • % Articles in Citable Items: the percent of citable items for the current data year that are articles, as opposed to reviews
  • Filter for Open Access journals: as defined by those in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
  • Data to download: for individual journals, journals in a specific subject area, or all journals
  • Year-to-year data: for each journal on its profile page
  • Journal relations visualization tool: shows citation patterns between journals

 

A new index has also been added to the Web of Science Core Collection. The Essential Science Citation Index (ESCI) expands the number of citations available for searching, and provides earlier visibility for sources under evaluation as part of Thomson Reuters yearly content selection process. Inclusion in this index will provide greater discoverability which will lead to measurable citations and more transparency in the selection process.

Thomson Reuters Resources: Changes for 2016:http://www.cdlib.org/cdlinfo/2016/06/27/thomson-reuters-resources-changes-for-2016/

Introduction to Journal Citation Reports (JCR) and Essential Scientific Indicators (ESI)

Journal Citation Reports (JCR) allows users to critically evaluate journals based on citation data. When looking for a journal to publish in, to assess its influence on the field or how important it is to a specific community, this is the tool to use to find its impact factor and ranking. To access JCR, look to its tab at the top of the main Web of Science page.

When you land on the main page for JCR, you will see the following:

 

The default page is set to rank journal titles by impact factor, but you can also select for journal categories ranked by number of journals. You can choose to sort by Full Journal Title alphabetically, Total Cites by number, Journal Impact Factor, or Eigenfactor Score. There are a variety of ways to filter on the left side of the page as well.

Journal Impact Factor means the average number of times that articles published in the journal within the past two years have been cited in the JCR year. Each JCR year contains a year of citation data, and you select this to the left of the page, midway down and past Select Categories. Since this requires at least a year of publication data collection, Journal Impact Factor is at least a year old.

The score is factored by dividing the number of citations in the JCR year by the total number of articles published in the journal within the past two years. For example, to have a Journal Impact Factor of 1.0 means that the articles published in the journal within the past two years have been cited one time on average in the selected JCR year.

Eigenfactor Score means the number of times that articles published in the journal within the past five years have been cited in the JCR year. This score doesn’t value all citations equally, but rather weighs journals with higher citations more significantly. It also doesn’t factor in journal self-citation.

Essential Scientific Indicators (ESI) visually ranks authors, institutions, countries, and journals, and links to influential papers to help identify top researchers or institutions in specific fields. This tool is best used to compare metrics beyond journals. To access ESI, look to its tab at the top of the main Web of Science page.

When you land on the main page for ESI, you will see the following:

The default page is under the tab Indicators, set to rank top papers by research field with an optional and interactive global map for visualization. The other options are Authors, Institutions, Journals, Countries-Territories, and Research Fronts, and you can add multiple filters.

The tab Field Baselines looks at the annualized expected citation rates for papers in a research field. This can be broken up by Citation Rates, the yearly averages of citations per paper; Percentiles, which define levels of citation activity; or Field Rankings, which provide 10-year citation rates and aggregate counts of highly cited papers.

The tab Citation Thresholds looks at the minimum number of citations within a research field, obtained by ranking papers in descending order by citation count and then selecting the top fraction or percentage of papers. This can be broken up by ESI Thresholds, which shows the number of citations received by the top 1% of authors and institutions and the top 50% of countries and journals in a 10-year period; Highly Cited Thresholds, which shows the minimum number of citations received by the top 1% of papers from each of 10 database years; or Hot Paper Thresholds, which shows the minimum number of citations received during the most recent two-month period by the top 0.1% of papers from the past two years.

Thomson Reuter's guide to Journal Evaluation & Highly Cited Research: http://wokinfo.com/media/pdf/JEHCR