Poor Influences and Criminal Locations: Los Angeles’ Skid Row, Multicultural Identities, and Normal Homosexuality

Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 12:00pm to 2:30pm

Nic John RamosNic John Ramos (American Studies & Ethnicity, USC, 2017; and Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Race in Science & Medicine, Brown University)

Our second program of the Spring quarter, on Thursday, 18 May 2017 at 12:00 pm, will be a presentation by Nic John Ramos (American Studies & Ethnicity, USC, 2017; and Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Race in Science & Medicine, Brown University) on “Poor Influences and Criminal Locations: Los Angeles’ Skid Row, Multicultural Identities, and Normal Homosexuality”:  

This presentation illuminates the role that mental health providers, civil rights and gay rights activists, and urban planners played during Mayor Tom Bradley’s administration in constructing urban spaces to prove the existence of “normal” racial and homosexual subjects.  To construct these spaces in the 1980s, these diverse actors used community mental health theory to depict Los Angeles’ Skid Row as an “open air mental health facility” and West Hollywood and South Los Angeles as spaces for health and productive racial and homosexual citizens.

Buffet-service lunch salads will be available for attendees who confirm before 9 a.m.on Monday, May 15th, when we place the catering order. (Please be advised that we require reservations because of university policy; we must submit a list of confirmed attendees when placing our catering order. If you have RSVP’d but cannot attend, kindly let us know, in case we can reduce the catering order or offer your seat to someone else.)

Seating is limited; reservations are REQUIRED. Please RSVP to reserve if you plan on attending. There may not be seating available for drop-ins on the day of the forum.

 

Reservations may be made by contacting History & Special Collections for the Sciences (voice: 310.825.6940; email: speccoll-medsci@library.ucla.edu).

This UCLA History of Medicine and Medical Humanities Research Forum (this is the 40th meeting of the series) is made possible by the History & Social Studies of Medicine Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; and by History & Special Collections for the Sciences, UCLA Library Special Collections.